BP versus Exelon

Two energy companies made the cut in the 2005 edition of Wired Magazine’s annual article about cutting edge companies. This year’s installment of the survey led with the following quote: “They’re masters of technology and innovation. They’re global thinkers driven by strategic vision. They’re nimbler than Martha Stewart’s PR team. They’re The Wired 40.” Both […]

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Are Nuclear Plants Really Terrorist Targets?

On September 11, 2001, three fully fueled transcontinental airplanes became terrorist weapons, causing a huge amount of direct damage and killing more than 3,000 people living and working in the United States. Though terrorist attacks are nothing new, the scale and impact of these three coordinated attacks from the air caused a complete revaluation of […]

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Replacing Oil With Uranium

Truckers, farmers, parcel services, chemical manufacturers, airlines, bus companies, and railroads all need uranium to begin replacing oil. No, they do not yet need their own reactors, but they would all benefit substantially if more nuclear power plants were built to allow more uranium to be used instead of oil and gas wherever possible. The […]

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Time for Plan B – Yucca Mountain Project Should Close Shop

More than three years ago, I wrote about the Yucca Mountain project, telling you that I thought that the entire concept was stupid because it was based on flawed assumptions. (See Yucca Mountain: Right Answer; Wrong Question) I also promised that I would discuss a better solution in a future article. The future is now, […]

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Fusion versus Fission – Difficult versus Easy

Yesterday morning (3 March 2005) I heard a story on National Public Radio (NPR) that reminded me why I chose an engineering focused career instead of once focused on science. (Aside: I carefully avoid calling myself an engineer, though I have played one in the Navy for a couple of decades. My undergraduate degree is […]

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Saying the ‘N’ word Nuclear – in polite company

The ‘n’ word is definitely back in fashion. There are at least five large partnerships in the United States that are preparing to build new nuclear power plants, though all of them are keeping a rather low profile. The five identified efforts include a consortium led by Excelon that is investigating an early site permit […]

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Time for a Different Approach for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation by Dr. J. M. Cuttler, P. Eng, Cuttler & Associates, Inc.

The ICRP-2005 recommendations are very similar to its 1990 recommendations. They are still based on the 50-year-old linear no threshold (LNT) hypothesis of radiation carcinogenesis (and congenital malformations), which is contradicted by the science of biology. Generally, living organisms do not respond to ionizing radiation in a linear manner in the range from 1 mGy […]

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A case for using more nuclear energy by Dr. J. M. Cuttler, P. Eng

A change in our current course is appropriate in light of the projected shortage of generating capacity in Ontario and the August 14 blackout, which revealed to everyone that nothing works without electricity. The signs of an approaching energy crisis are clear as oil supply and demand move out of balance, putting increasing pressure on […]

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