Similar Posts

Recent Comments from our Readers

  1. Avatar
  2. Avatar
  3. Avatar
  4. Avatar
  5. Avatar

5 Comments

  1. As much as I enjoy the enthusiasm of B&W for the Mpower reactor, being first to produce power is a real long shot.
    The competition has long since filed their design certification applications. The lead site for each of those designs have submitted their COLs.
    B&W has released a target of 1st quarter of 2012 for design application submittal (Not the 1st quarter of 2010 erroneously listed on the NRC web site). There is no reference site yet for an Mpower reactor (although TVA is considering it).
    A shorter build time can only do so much for catching up.
    Bill

  2. “A shorter build time can only do so much for catching up.”
    True, but easier financing might more than make up for that.

  3. ?A shorter build time can only do so much for catching up.?
    One of the favorite arguments of solar advocates is that it takes too long to build a nuke and that solar can come on line faster.
    If you take the capacity of the new nuke in being built in Finland (near the arctic circle) times the design CF times design life you get about 18,000 MW-years of generating capacity per year of construction.
    However, the plant is taking two years longer to build so now we are down to 13,000 MW-years of generating capacity per year of construction. On the positive side if the plant runs longer than designed we could get 20,000 MW-years of generating capacity per year of construction.
    Then I use the same method for my favorite utility scale solar PV systems and get 30 MW-years of generating capacity per year of construction.
    So no, you can not catch up bu building smaller.

  4. Kit, are years of construction fixed regardless of capacity? They might be, today, but you aren’t “thinking outside the box”. If someone came up with a nuclear power module that would be safe regardless of where it was sited, then construction could be as simple as pouring a concrete pad, putting the module on it, and hooking up the wires.
    You wouldn’t even need a license for the site, just a design that was NRC certified, and a module prebuilt to that design. All you’d need was 20 days, perhaps, not 20 years.

Comments are closed.