Search Results for: Reduce reuse recycle

| |

Radioactive isotopes are too useful to waste

…wisest mantras of responsible environmentalism to radioactive materials – Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. It’s almost always irresponsible to casually use any material once and then treat it in a way that makes it difficult or impossible for that material to perform any other function or serve anyone else’s needs. It’s especially irresponsible and wasteful to use rare materials with special physical properties in that selfish and careless manner. It’…

| |

Is it really necessary to have a deep geologic repository for used nuclear fuel?

…s, specifically) is one idea I’ve heard at conferences, etc.., as a way to reduce residual weld stresses and thus reduce susceptability to CISCC. And yes, putting degraded (leaking?) canisters inside another canister/overpack is an idea that we’ve considered. That would be much easier than opening a canister and unloading fuel, but I’m sure most utilities would still think of that as a major operation. Also, in the context of very long (multi-cent…

| | | | | |

Transcript of Atomic Show #61 – Allison Macfarlane, Atomic Agnostic (June 15, 2007)

…ere else. (49:21) Adams: Part of the reason that I believe that we need to reduce, reuse and recycle most of the materials that we use in an industrial society is that’s just the right thing to do. It’s the right thing to do whether it is office paper, aluminum cans or used nuclear fuel. As it happens, used nuclear fuel has a lot more value, particularly since it gives us the ability to not burn as much coal, oil and natural gas every year as we d…

Blast from the Past – Atomic Insights Letter From The Editor, June 1995 – Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

…tact: Letter from the Editor: Recycling: Practice What You Preach Recycle, reuse, reduce. These are the watchwords of people who are concerned about reducing the impact that man and his activities have on the world’s natural resources. The ideas that the words embody are logical and can be reasonably applied to making the world a more prosperous place to live. I was introduced to the concepts at a very early age. As a family project we constructed…

| |

Reduce, reuse, recycle – good for aluminum; good for uranium

…ctors. Did you know that US nuclear power plants produce the energy equivalent of 4 million barrels of oil per day using just 2,000 tons of commercial nuclear fuel every year? Anyone who wants to conserve resources and reduce the material impact of human society on the earth’s environment should stop saying “no nukes” and start saying “know nukes.” Rod Adams Publisher, Atomic Insights Host and producer, The Atomic Show Podcast…

| | |

Recycling used nuclear fuel – Argonne research explained in 4 min video

…ve an amazing potential for future improvements by following the adage of “reduce, reuse, and recycle” to shrink an already minuscule quantity of waste per unit of energy to even smaller sizes and easier to handle forms. There is a communications risk associated with telling some people about the incredible potential associated with nuclear fuel recycling. The video alludes to the challenge; if we can recycle the used material produced by our curr…

| | | | |

Why are smaller reactors attracting so much interest?

…r waste, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jun 17, 2022 For sodium waste, reuse in new reactors has the potential for a dramatic decrease in waste that needs to be processed for disposal, but only if there is a growing population of sodium-cooled reactors. The potential for reuse of sodium from reactors is limited. The most likely utilization would be as a reactor coolant, but there are currently no LMFRs being constructed where sodium waste is a…

| | | |

“Waste issue” is part of antinuclear movement strategy of constipation

…uge asset? What antinuke lefty could be against the industry’s efforts to “reduce, reuse and recycle?” More importantly, however, it would change the channel politically. If a successfully operating and ECONOMIC LMFBR facility were up and running, then the industry could shout loud and often that the “waste” is a CO2-free energy resource equivalent to X Saudi Arabias worth Y $trillions, and that we don’t need to spend billions to dispose of it, bu…

| | | | |

How Did the MOX Project Get So Expensive?

…d to pursue for more than two decades. Instead of abiding by the mantra of reduce, reuse and recycle, they want to mix the material with a diluent whose composition is classified and bury it deep underground without allowing any of the potential energy to enter into the world market. Getting rid of the 34 tons covered by the 2000 vintage Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement (PMDA) in this manner is just a beginning; it will establish a p…

| | | | |

Fantasy Crossfire debate: Ed Lyman versus Rod Adams on fast breeder reactors

…term radiotoxicity and volume. Till and Chang were true believers in the “reduce, recycle and reuse” mantra that guides the thoughts and actions of true environmentalists. Lyman: Moreover, fast reactors have inherent instabilities that make them far more dangerous than light-water reactors under certain accident conditions, conditions that were studiously avoided in the 1986 dog-and-pony show at EBR-II. Adams: The entire design of the EBR-II was…

Fission can improve mental health by alleviating climate doomsday thinking
|

Fission can improve mental health by alleviating climate doomsday thinking

…rom several thousand years to roughly 300 years. These improved cycles can reuse or recycle some of the fuel materials that have previously been categorized and stored as “waste.” That’s why it’s more common to hear nuclear professionals referring to nuclear waste as future fuel. Nuclear energy system designers are incorporating technological advances from fields outside of nuclear energy to make their systems more attractive. They are working to…

| | | | | |

Putting excitement back into nuclear technology development

…SFR for 1 year generating 1 GWe of electricity. The 5 tons of used fuel is recycled to remove 1 ton of fission products. 1 ton of depleted U is added to the remaining 4 tons of recycled fuel and returned to the reactor for another year. The 1 ton of fission products will return to background radiation levels in about 300 years. In summary over a period of 200 years, both the LWR and SFR fuel cycles will produce 200 GWe of electricity. the LWR will…

End of content

End of content